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Confessions: Philosophy, Guilt, and Inner Life

at Brooklyn Institute for Social Research

(27)
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$315
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Description
Class Level: Beginner
Age Requirements: 21 and older
Average Class Size: 14
System Requirements:

You will need a reliable Internet connection as well as a computer or device with which you can access your virtual class. We recommend you arrive to class 5-10 minutes early to ensure you're able to set up your device and connection.


Class Delivery:

Classes will be held via Zoom.


Teacher: Samantha Hill

Flexible Reschedule Policy: This provider has flexible, free rescheduling for any-in person workshop. Please see the cancellation policy for more details

What you'll learn in this philosophy class:

What are confessions? Why are we seduced by them? Why do writers choose the confessional form? How do we understand confessions as literary texts? How do we read confessions as theological or philosophical works? What is one doing when they publicly confess their misdeeds or sexual exploits?

From Augustine who took pleasure in wickedness, to Rousseau who wanted to provide a picture of man “in every way true to nature,” to Thomas De Quincey who chronicled his hallucinatory experiences on opium, confessional writers invite us into their inner worlds. Can confessions help us deepen our understanding of the individual in relationship to culture, society, politics, and religion? How are we to understand confessions as an act, a form, a literary experience, apart from memoir, biography, or autofiction?

This course will explore the confessional writings of Augustine, Theresa of Avila, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Michel Foucault. Alongside our four confessors we’ll also turn to Thomas De Quincey, André Gide, Sylvia Plath, and Anne Sexton to help us think about the history and politics of the confessional form while asking: Is there any truth to be found in confessions? How do we distinguish confessions from memoir and autobiography? How does one recount their struggles, from juvenile transgressions to adult debauchery? In a society of hyper-individualism what can confessions teach us about contemporary conceptions of authenticity and self-revelation?


Remote Learning

This course is available for "remote" learning and will be available to anyone with access to an internet device with a microphone (this includes most models of computers, tablets). Classes will take place with a "Live" instructor at the date/times listed below.

Upon registration, the instructor will send along additional information about how to log-on and participate in the class.

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Refund Policy

Upon request, we will refund the entire cost of a class up until 1 week before its start date. Students who withdraw after that point but before the first class are entitled to a 75% refund. After the first class: 50%. After the second: 25%. No refunds will be given after the third class.

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Reviews of Classes at Brooklyn Institute for Social Research (27)

School: Brooklyn Institute for Social Research

Brooklyn Institute for Social Research

The Brooklyn Institute for Social Research was established in 2011 in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn. Its mission is to extend liberal arts education and research far beyond the borders of the traditional university, supporting community education needs and opening up new possibilities for scholarship in the...

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